Community Association prepares for new era

August 27 2019

PEOPLE living in and around Staple Hill are invited to get the first glimpse of the revamped Page Community Association.

Members of the management council Rob Lancaster, Dave Foster, Geoff Cummins, Sally Cummins, Nick Long (trustee) and Shirley Potts

Members of the management council Rob Lancaster, Dave Foster, Geoff Cummins, Sally Cummins, Nick Long (trustee) and Shirley Potts


It is hoped that the community facility will help fill the gap left by the loss of the Royal British Legion building which closed suddenly in 2016.
Page Community Association has been working from the Page building in Page Road since its formation in the late 1970s.
Now, forty years on, the building has been renovated and now boasts a smart new bar and lounge area, sports room with snooker table and darts board, snooker hall with full size tables as well as a function hall, meeting rooms and kitchens.
The centre also boasts table tennis, pool, short mat bowls, kick boxing, karate and ballroom dancing, as well as hosting various clubs and organisations including St Mary's Players, Rolls Royce Retirees Club and the Concorde Wheelchair Dancers.
It is hoped people living in the area will take the opportunity to see what's on offer at the centre during an open afternoon later this month.
To mark the anniversary, Page Community Association will be relaunched on Saturday September 28 by the Lord Lieutenant of Gloucestershire, Edward Gillespie, who will cut a cake made specially for the occasion.
From 1.30-4.30pm the building will be open to the public when they will be able to visit the facilities and take part in a range of activities. These will include musical and dancing performances in the hall, first aid demonstrations, including CPR, and snooker coaching sessions.
An exhibition of photographs of old Staple Hill will be on show in the committee rooms and cookery demonstrations take place in the main kitchen.
The building was originally shared by Staple Hill Library and the Page Institute, which provided educational opportunities for local workers.
In the late 1970s the library moved to the town centre leaving the whole building to accommodate the newly formed Page Community Association, which incorporated the Page Institute and aimed to serve the various needs of the community.
Benefactor Alderman Arthur William Page, who provided the land for Page Park in 1910 as a gift to the community, contributed to the cost of the original building.
Former Staple Hill councillor Shirley Potts, who is a member of Page Community Association, said: “The Page community building is already used by groups which hire the facilities but now the aim is to also reach out to the community and to organise events and activities which answer community needs.
“The building has much to offer and our grateful thanks go to those members who have been responsible for the refurbishment.
“This splendid facility can fill the gap created by the closure of the British Legion.
“We hope that many members of the public will visit on this special day and perhaps make suggestions for future developments. The building is a community asset which we must not lose.”
The Royal British Legion building in Kendall Road, which had been described as the “hub of our community” by Staple Hill councillor Ian Boulton, closed its doors under mysterious circumstances.
The building has now been sold.